The Beauty Around Us

Showcases Portraiture, Scenic & Nature Photography and Feaures a Photo Journal Blog

Sachs Covered Bridge

Bob and I vacationed in Gettysburg earlier this month.  During the morning of Monday, November 19th (our last day there), we visited Sachs Covered Bridge.

Sachs Covered Bridge was built around 1852.

Sachs Covered Bridge is a 100-feet long, Town truss covered bridge and crosses over Marsh Creek.

Sachs Covered Bridge

During the Civil War both the Union and Confederate armies used Sachs Covered Bridge in the Battle of Gettysburg and its aftermath. It is reportedly known to be severely haunted as a result.

 

9 Responses to “Sachs Covered Bridge”

  1. Anonymous

    Did you feel any presence of the ghosts of the Civil War? 🙂 I’ve been to Gettysburg several times but I never knew of that bridge. We will have to look it up next time!

    Reply
  2. Betsy

    Beautiful –and in such good condition. I can understand why it was considered haunted after the Battle of Gettysburg.

    I love covered bridges –but I also have enjoyed your Gettysburg experience.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

    Reply
  3. Les

    Even though I’ve been to Gettysburg 4 times, I’ve missed the Sachs Covered Bridge for some reason. I have read that the Bridge is quite haunted by both Armies of the Civil War. Stange voices from nowhere, ghostly appriations, and other things that can’t be explained. Must have been a long drive for you guys. It’s about 4 hrs. away for me. Nice Images you’ve taken.

    Reply
  4. David P.

    This will seem a fanciful story, but seeing this bridge triggered some regressive memories. You see, I had nightmares from the age of two centering around the battle for a Civil War bridge.

    Before I continue, let me just note that research was conducted involving 100 little boys who shared a similar experience. The study was completed in the early ’60’s — 100 years after the Civil War was fought.

    Using past-life regression (hypnosis) each of the boys described in detail a Civil War battle in which they were killed. The regressive memories matched the details of the boy’s nightmares.

    Past-life regression is uniformly dismissed by science. Such accounts are attributed to a person’s flawed memory. Our brain cobbles together bits and pieces of stored information to fabricate an untrue, but fascinating tale. However, my dream began when I was two-years-old. As a toddler, I knew nothing of the Civil War.

    What makes my experience more astonishing is that a little black boy would appear at my bedside. He thanked me for saving his life and then the dream (or vision) would begin.

    My Dad enjoyed watching college football games on Saturday. When teams from the South were playing there would be a sea of Confederate flags. Just the sight of the flag made me go ballistic. I’d become so agitated that I’d start punching the walls. No one could figure out why.

    Well, here’s a short narration of my dream composed in the style of an observer.

    “He was a Captain in the Federal Army of the United States. His assignment was to capture a Confederate bridge. The Captain was mounted as he led a column of foot soldiers through a thicket of trees towards the creek bridge.

    The sounds of hell roared through the thicket. It was bloody and brutal; and the only thought a soldier had was to fight, or die.

    In a close-quarter skirmish the captain suffered a fatal chest wound and died on the battlefield.”

    The same dream (nightmare) recurred for ten years. It was like watching the Bill Murray movie, Groundhog Day.

    After a bit of study and research I determined that my dream was a reenactment of actual events that occurred at Antietam Creek. The Battle of Antietam (September 17, 1862) was the bloodiest one-day battle of the Civil War.

    The objective of the battle was to capture Burnside’s (Lower) Bridge. Union forces prevailed in a victory that afforded President Lincoln the political advantage to deliver the Emancipation Proclamation.

    So there you have it. It is a compelling story that suggests the possibility of reincarnation. All I know is that it is very difficult for me to look at these images, but cathartic at the same time.

    Reply
    • Linda G.

      Thank you for sharing your dream and your determination that the dream was based on actual events many years before you were born. I am sorry that my covered bridge photosgraphs evoked regressive, disturbing memories. I am glad that there is a positive effect as well.

      Reply
      • David P.

        Oh, don’t be sorry. I didn’t have to look. I forced myself to view all of your Gettysburg photos.

        Anyway, my dream eventually ceased, but you’ll never guess how. Mom and Dad took me to an Elvis Presley movie (“It Happened at the World’s Fair”) when I was 12.

        On the big screen was this larger than life persona — a good ol’ Southern boy who had an amazing zest for life.

        Elvis had the charisma to erase all of my negative feelings towards the South — its culture and people, but I still retain the memories.

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