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Posts from the ‘Pennsylvania’ category

The 155th Anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

Bob and I vacationed in Gettysburg earlier this month.  We attended Gettysburg Remembrance Day activities, toured the battlefield, and caught the last few minutes of the Gettysburg Dedication Day ceremony.  This blog post, my last in a series pertaining to our recent Gettysburg vacation, is about Gettysburg Dedication Day.

 

Monday, November 19th, marked the 155th anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Each year since 1938, a ceremony has been held on November 19th to commemorate Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and to rededicate Soldiers’ National Cemetery (now known as Gettysburg National Cemetery) where Lincoln spoke on November 19, 1863. The date of November 19th was formally designated as Dedication Day on November 19, 1946 . 

Bob and I attended this year’s Gettysburg Dedication Day ceremony at Gettysburg National Cemetery the morning of November 19th.  We just missed hearing “President Lincoln” recite The Gettysburg Address.  We caught the last chorus of “Battle Hymn of the Republic”.

Dedication Day Ceremony at Gettysburg National Cemetery – Wayne Hill sings “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”.

 

We also witnessed a Naturalization Ceremony, which neither Bob nor I had ever seen.

 

 

As the Dedication Ceremony was winding down, we moved farther away so that I could capture a photograph of the Speaker’s Rostrum and the crowd.

Speaker’s Rostrum

Speaker’s Rostrum

 

When the dedication ceremony concluded, we went for a walk on a paved walkway through the cemetery.  We followed loosely this virtual tour that I found and opened, as we began our walk.

Beyond the black iron fence is Gettysburg’s public Evergreen Cemetery. This cemetery was established in 1853.

 

Bivouac of the Dead plaque

There are several of these metal plaques located in the cemetery.  Each plaque contain excerpts from Theodore O’Hara’s 1847 poem “The Bivouac of the Dead”.  Looking beyond the plaque you see the first of the gravestones, laid out in rows, which mark the final resting place for over 3,500 Union soldiers who died at Gettysburg.

 

The Soldiers’ National Monument honors the fallen soldiers.

 

Gravestones

 

Note the penny with Lincoln’s head up on this gravestone.  We saw pennies on many gravestones.

 

President Lincoln at Soldier’s National Monument

 

New York State Monument

New York State Monument

 

November 19th was the last night of our 4-night stay in Gettysburg.  What a WONDERFUL vacation we had!  What a memorable experience we had of being in Gettysburg for Remembrance Day activities and the 155th anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address!

We are looking forward to our next visit to Gettysburg!

 

Sachs Covered Bridge

Bob and I vacationed in Gettysburg earlier this month.  During the morning of Monday, November 19th (our last day there), we visited Sachs Covered Bridge.

Sachs Covered Bridge was built around 1852.

Sachs Covered Bridge is a 100-feet long, Town truss covered bridge and crosses over Marsh Creek.

Sachs Covered Bridge

During the Civil War both the Union and Confederate armies used Sachs Covered Bridge in the Battle of Gettysburg and its aftermath. It is reportedly known to be severely haunted as a result.

 

Gettysburg Battlefield Tour Part 3 of 3

This blog post continues our tour of the Gettysburg Battlefield.  Tuesday’s blog post pertained to Auto Stops 1-3 and provided notable events that occurred during the first day of the three-day battle.  Wednesday’s blog post pertained to Auto Tour Stops 4-9 and provided notable events that occurred during the second day of the three-day battle.  Today’s blog post pertains to Auto Tour Stops 10-16 and provides notable events that occurred during the second and third days of the three-day battle (July 2-3, 1863).

Day 2: July 2, 1863

 

Auto Tour Stop #10
The Peach Orchard

“The Union line extended from Devil’s Den to here, then angled northward on Emmitsburg Road. Federal cannon bombarded Southern forces crossing the Rose Farm toward the Wheatfield until about 6:30 p.m., when Confederate attacks overran this position.” – The Auto Tour

The 73rd New York Infantry Monument near the Peach Orchard with the Sherfy Farm Barn in the background

On our way to Auto Tour Stop #11 we passed by the Trostle Farm.

Trostle Farm Barn

This barn shows some battle damage.  Do you see the cannon hole in the brick?

Auto Tour Stop #11
Plum Run

“While fighting raged to the south at the Wheatfield and Little Round Top, retreating Union soldiers crossed this ground on their way from the Peach Orchard to Cemetery Ridge.” – The Auto Tour

I didn’t take any photographs at this stop.

Auto Tour Stop #12
Pennsylvania Memorial

“Union artillery held the line alone here on Cemetery Ridge late in the day as Meade called for infantry from Culp’s Hill and other areas to strengthen and hold the center of the Union position.” – The Auto Tour

The Pennsylvania Memorial is the largest memorial on the Gettysburg battlefield.

The statue of Winged Victory stands on top of the dome. The tip of the sword of the statue of Winged Victory is 110 feet high.

 

Auto Tour Stop #13
Spangler’s Spring

“About 7 p.m. Confederates attacked the right flank of the Union army and occupied the lower slopes of Culp’s Hill.  The next morning the Confederates were driven off after seven hours of fighting.”– The Auto Tour

I didn’t take any photographs at this stop.

Auto Tour Stop #14
East Cemetery Hill

“At dusk, Union forces repelled a Confederate assault that reached the crest of this hill. By day’s end, both flanks of the Union army had been attacked and both had held, despite losing ground. In a council of war, Meade, anticipating an assault on the center of his line, determined that his army would stay and fight.” – The Auto Tour

I didn’t take any photographs at this stop.

 

Day 3 – July 3, 1863

Auto Tour Stop #15
High-Water Mark

“Late in the afternoon, after a two-hour cannonade, some 7,000 Union soldiers posted around the copse of trees, The Angle, and the Brian Barn, repulsed the bulk of the 12,000-man “Pickett’s Charge” against the Federal center.  This was the climactic moment of the battle.  On July 4, Lee’s army began retreating.” – The Auto Tour

High-Water Mark is the location of the copse of trees mentioned in the Auto Tour.

High-Water Mark

Cannon across from High-Water Mark

On our way to Auto Tour Stop #16 we passed by the Memorial to the Grand Army of the Republic.

Memorial to the Grand Army of the Republic

This memorial is to Albert Woolson, the last survivor of the Grand Army of the Republic.  Albert went to war as a drummer boy at the age of 17. He died on August 2, 1956 at the age of 109.

The Gettysburg Battlefield is immense.  We spent 3 1/2 hours driving through the battlefield.  We could have easily spent many more hours there.  The grounds are peaceful and hauntingly beautiful when you think about the lives lost and the blood spilled there.

The last stop on the Auto Tour is Stop #16 at the Gettysburg National Cemetery.  We did not visit the cemetery on the same day that we toured the battlefield.  Please check back soon for a blog post pertaining to the Gettysburg National Cemetery.

We finished our battlefield tour shortly after 12:30 pm.  We returned to the Gettysburg National Military Park Visitor Center, from which we began our battlefield tour.  This was our second visit to Gettysburg.  Our first visit was in January 2016, at which time spent a couple hours at the Visitor Center.  During that visit we watched the showing of the film “A New Birth of Freedom”, narrated by Morgan Freeman.The film places the monumental events of the Battle of Gettysburg into the larger context of the Civil War and American history.  After watching the 20-minute film, we viewed the Gettysburg Cyclorama program, which immerses the viewer into the fury of Pickett’s Charge during the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg. The Gettysburg Cyclorama program is an amazing, realistic presentation!  We explored the museum during that visit as well.  The museum features relics of the Battle of Gettysburg and personalities who served in the Civil War, interactive exhibits, and multi-media presentations that cover the conflict from beginning to end.  We didn’t see any reason to spend time at the Visitor Center this year.  I did get our National Park Service passport stamped at the Visitor Center.  I also purchased a Gettysburg hoodie in the Museum Bookstore and had my picture taken with Abraham Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln and me at the Gettysburg National Military Park Visitor Center (Photo by Bob)

 

Gettysburg Battlefield Tour Part 2 of 3

This blog post continues our tour of the Gettysburg Battlefield.  Yesterday’s blog post pertained to Auto Stops 1-3 and provided notable events that occurred during the first day of the three-day battle.  This blog post pertains to Auto Tour Stops 4-9 and provides notable events that occurred during the second day of the three-day battle (July 2, 1863).

Auto Tour Stop #4
North Carolina Memorial

“Early in the day, the Confederate army positioned itself on high ground here along Seminary Ridge, through town and north of Cemetery and Culp’s hills. Union forces occupied Culp’s and Cemetery hills and along Cemetery Ridge south to the Round tops, The lines of both armies formed two parallel “fishhooks.”” – The Auto Tour

North Carolina Memorial

North Carolina Memorial

The statue depicts a wounded officer pointing the way forward to the enemy while a veteran and younger comrade lead a color bearer in the charge.

Auto Tour Stop #5
Virginia Memorial

“The large open field to the east is where the last Confederate assault of the battle known as “Pickett’s Charge”, occurred July 3rd.” – The Auto Tour

Virginia Memorial

The Virginia Memorial is the largest of the Confederate monuments on the Gettysburg battlefield. The monument stands 41 feet high. The statue of Lee and Traveler stands 14 feet high.

Confederate soldiers from Virginia represented various types who left civil occupations to join the Confederate Army. Left to right: a professional man, a mechanic, an artist, a boy, a business man, a farmer, and a youth.

Auto Tour Stop #6
Pitzer Woods

“In the afternoon of July 2, Lt. General James Longstreet placed his Confederate troops along Warfield Ridge, anchoring the left of his line in these woods.”  – The Auto Tour

The Mississippi Monument stands where General Barksdale’s Mississippi Brigade began their charge into the Peach Orchard on July 2nd and represents the desperate hand-to-hand fighting of that day.

Two farms can be seen from Auto Stop #6, the Joseph Sherfy Farm and the Trostle Farm.

Joseph Sherfy Farm

Joseph and Mary Sherfy and their six children were ordered away from the farm on the morning of July 2nd, driving their stock southeast of the Round Tops and to Two Taverns. Joseph and his son returned on July 6th to find their house ransacked and hit by at least seven artillery shells Their yard was covered with their possessions, which were trampled into the mud and mixed with blood, body parts and every imaginable kind of filth. The orchards and fences were destroyed and the fields covered with dead men and 48 dead horses. The ruins of the barn were filled with the charred remains of the men who had been unable to escape the fire.

Trostle Farm

Abraham and Catherine Trostle and their nine children were abruptly forced from their home during the fighting, leaving dinner on the table. Like many of their neighbors, the Trostles returned to find most of their belongings looted or destroyed.  Later in our battlefield tour we returned to the Trostle Farm and saw some battle damage (photos will be shared later).

Continuing on our auto tour we passed by the South Carolina Memorial, the Phillip Snyder Farm and the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument.

Phillip Snyder Farm with Big Round Top in the background

The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument stands a little over 19 feet high and depicts a charging color bearer calling for his comrades to follow.

Auto Tour Stop #7
Warfield Ridge

“Longstreet’s assaults began here at 4 p.m. They were directed against Union troops occupying Devil’s Den the Wheatfield, and Peach Orchard, and against Meade’s undefended left flank at The Round Tops.” – The Auto Tour

I didn’t take any photographs at the Warfield Ridge stop.

Auto Tour Stop #8
Little Round Top

“Quick action by Brig. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, Meade’s chief engineer, alerted Union officers to the Confederate threat and brought Federal reinforcements to defend this position.” – The Auto Tour

Little Round Top is covered with monuments commemorating the men who fought there.

Little Round Top – Monument to the 155th Pennsylvania Volunteers

Little Round Top – Gouverneur Warren Monument

Little Round Top – Gouverneur Warren Monument

Little Round Top – Monument to the 91st Pennsylvania Volunteers

Little Round Top – Monument to the 12th and 44th New York Volunteers

Little Round Top

Little Round Top –  COL Strong Vincent was mortally wounded commanding the brigade that defended the southern slopes and summit of Little Round Top on July 2, 1863.

I have a story about finding this memorial to COL Strong Vincent.  A friend, Tom H., and his girlfriend Lynne W. planned to meet us in Gettysburg the weekend we were there.  The poor weather conditions that weekend made them cancel their travel plans.

Tom portrays COL Strong Vincent.

See?

Tom as COL Strong Vincent (Photo by Path of Memories Photography by Lynne’)

Tom planned to march in the Remembrance Day parade and show Bob and me around the battlefield.  Tom’s battlefield expertise, particularly as it pertains to COL Strong Vincent, would have been most helpful.  While at Little Round Top we looked for signs about, memorials to and/or statues of COL Strong Vincent.  We found a sign about COL Strong Vincent.

Defense of Little Round Top

The Defense of Little Round Top sign displayed above reads as follows:

“A great basin lay before us full of smoke and fire, and literally swarming with riderless horses and fighting, fleeing, and pursuing men.”
1st Lt. Porter Farley, U.S.A.
140th New York Infantry

Col. Strong Vincent and his 1,300-man Union infantry brigade rushed to defend this hill about 4:00 p.m. on July 2-and none too soon. Just as his men took position on the slopes below, Texans and Alabamians of Maj. Gen. John B. Hood’s division began streaming out of the woods to your left. Rapid, deadly fire from Vincent’s line drove them back.

Hood’s determined men rallied and renewed the fight. When the Union right flank began to crumble, Colonel Vincent went to their aid. While exposed, he fell mortally wounded.

Just when the Federals seemed doomed, over the hill behind you poured the 140th New York Infantry led by Col. Patrick O’Rorke. The New Yorkers, who had no time to load their muskets, swept down the hill in front of you into the surging Confederates. O’Rorke fell dead when a bullet pierced his neck. After a bloody struggle the exhausted Southerners fell back, leaving Little Round Top in Union hands.

We found the memorial to COL Strong Vincent (displayed earlier) but failed to identify the statue of COL Strong Vincent.  As I was reading the Gettysburg Stone Sentinels article to which I linked the COL Strong Vincent memorial, I realized that we passed right by the statue of COL Strong Vincent on our hill climb to his memorial!

It would be great if Tom and Lynne are able to meet us the next time Bob and I visit Gettysburg!

Looking down on Devil’s Den from Little Round Top

Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles positioned the left flank of his Third Corps at this unusual geologic formation, thinking its rugged nature would hinder Confederate troop movements. However, Confederates captured Devil’s Den on the afternoon of July 2, 1863.  From concealed places among the rocks, Southern snipers and sharpshooters kept the Union soldiers on Little Round Top under fire.

Auto Tour Stop #9
The Wheatfield

“Charge and countercharge left this field and the nearby woods strewn with over 4,000 dead and wounded.” – The Auto Tour

I didn’t take any photographs at The Wheatfield stop.

Please check back soon for Gettysburg Battlefield Tour, Part 3.

 

Gettysburg Battlefield Tour Part 1 of 3

Bob and I vacationed in Gettysburg earlier this month.  We attended Gettysburg Remembrance Day activities, toured the battlefield, and caught the last few minutes of the Gettysburg Dedication Ceremony.

The Gettysburg National Military Park was formed in 1895 on the land where the battle was fought as a memorial to honor the Confederate and Union soldiers. The park’s highlight is the 24-mile auto tour which covers the notable events that occurred throughout the conflict.  The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War, the Union victory that ended General Robert E. Lee’s second and most ambitious invasion of the North. Gettysburg was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and was also the inspiration for President Abraham Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address”.

We toured the Gettysburg battlefield on Sunday, November 18th.

Visitors can choose to go on a self-guided auto tour of the battlefield, using the National Park Service’s free “Touring the Battlefield” map.  The map is available at the National Park Service Information Desk in the Visitor Center.  In addition there are several guided tours available at various prices.  For example visitors can tour the battlefield, via the Gettysburg Foundation, with a Licensed Battlefield Guide—privately, in your own car, or by bus.  A bus tour with a Licensed Battlefield Guide currently costs $35 (adult, ages 13+) and $21 (children, ages 6-12).  Children under the age of 6 are free.  Visitors can tour the battlefield at their own pace, too.  The Gettysburg Field Guide, which includes an 80-page battlefield guide and audio CD/smartphone versions of the tour, costs $29.99.  This field guide, as well as others, can be purchased in the Museum Bookstore either in person or online.

We opted for a guided battlefield tour at our own pace.  We purchased the Tour Buddy app “Gettysburg Driving Tour” for $9.99.  This app is available on the App Store or Google Play.  The Gettysburg Driving Tour app follows the National Park Service’s 16-stop self-guided auto tour.  The tour starts at the Visitor Center and traces the three-day battle in chronological order.  The app is GPS triggered.  As we drove through the battlefield, the app triggered at various points.   Our tour guide, Joe, told the story of Gettysburg at each of these points.  You can take your time and spend as long as you like touring the battlefield or zip through in about 1.5 hours.  We did both 🙂

I will prepare three blog posts about our tour of the Gettysburg battlefield.  This blog post pertains to Auto Tour Stops 1-3 and provides notable events that occurred during the first day of the three-day battle (July 1, 1863).

Auto Tour Stop #1
McPherson Ridge

“The Battle of Gettysburg began at about 8 a.m. to the west beyond the McPherson Barn as Union cavalry confronted Confederate Infantry advancing east along Chambersburg Pike. Heavy fighting spread north and south along this ridgeline as additional forces from both sides arrived.” –The Auto Tour

Edward McPherson Barn

Leaving Auto Tour Stop #1 we crossed over the McPherson Ridge Railway Cut.  On July 1, 1863 the railroad tracks had not yet been placed but provided a deep entrenchment.  During the day, the Union army deployed near the railway cut to contest the attacks of the Confederate army. The Confederates were held off during the morning and early afternoon but were able to drive off the Union army due to superior numbers.

McPherson Ridge Railway Cut

Auto Tour Stop #2
Eternal Light Peace Memorial

“At 1 PM Major General Robert E. Rodes’ Confederates attacked from this hill, threatening Union forces on McPherson and Oak Ridges. Seventy-five years later, over 1,800 Civil War veterans helped dedicate this memorial to ‘Peace Eternal in a National United’.” – The Auto Tour

Approaching the Eternal Light Peace Memorial

 

Auto Tour Stop #3
Oak Ridge

“Union soldiers here held stubbornly against Rodes’s advance. By 3:30 p.m., however, the entire Union line from here to McPherson Ridge had begun to crumble, finally falling back to Cemetery Hill. When the first day ended, the Confederates held the upper hand. Lee decided to continue the offensive, pitting his 70,000 men army against Meade’s Union army of 93,000.” – The Auto Tour

Oak Ridge Observation Tower

We did not climb the observation tower, from which I read one can see Oak Ridge–the top of a hill that was the location of the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg combat.

 

Please check back soon for Gettysburg Battlefield Tour, Part 2.

 

 

 

Gettysburg Remembrance Day

Bob and I vacationed in Gettysburg earlier this month.  We attended Gettysburg Remembrance Day activities, toured the battlefield, and caught the last few minutes of the Gettysburg Dedication Ceremony.  This blog post is about arriving in Gettysburg and Remembrance Day activities.

We departed our home in Warren PA at 12:40 pm on Friday, November 16th.  We arrived in Gettysburg at approximately 6:15 pm.  We checked in at the Best Western Gettysburg.  We spent four nights at this hotel.  All four nights were free, as we used reward points for our entire stay.

All in all it was a good travel day.  Our only concern was making it safely to Gettysburg.  The previous day had brought lots of snow and ice to the area that we drove through on Friday.  Gettysburg received 8 inches of snow.  We are thankful that the roads were not icy, just wet. 

Our hotel room was nice and spacious.  We had two queen beds separated by a nightstand, desk and chair, arm chair with ottoman, small round table by the arm chair, three-drawer chest of drawers with a small flat screen TV on top of it, and plenty of lights.  The “foyer” had a closet and mini kitchen complete with refrigerator, microwave, coffee maker, AND cabinet space.  The bathroom door was in the foyer.  There was nothing out of the ordinary about the bathroom.

I went to bed at 9:00 pm and, as expected, awakened early the next day.  I got up at 4:30 am; Bob was already up.

We went to breakfast at 6:00 am.  Breakfast was EXCELLENT, and it is by far the nicest breakfast room we have seen at a hotel.  Breakfast included food that we are accustomed to see at Best Western Plus hotels, plus one addition.  For the first time ever we saw a pancake maker.  It serves two pancakes at once.  Bob said the pancakes were good.  I had a waffle that first morning (and every morning thereafter).  The breakfast room attendant was talkative and provided valuable information about the afternoon’s Remembrance Day parade such as from where to watch the parade, to bring our chairs there early (we had chairs in the car but chose not to use them), and from what side of the street to watch the parade to avoid wind.  She also provided the names, locations and type of food served at several nearby restaurants.

Remembrance Day is held each year on a Saturday in November.  This year, Remembrance Day was celebrated on November 17th.  Remembrance Day honors the soldiers and civilians of the American Civil War.  Civil War reenactors have a big parade. There are also numerous side events throughout the battlefield where reenactors honor specific units at their monuments, placing wreaths and holding other ceremonies. At night, there are balls and other gatherings.  Weather permitting a luminary candle is lit on each Civil War soldier’s grave.

Being in Gettysburg for Remembrance Day activities it was easy to feel as though time had gone backwards.  As I stood (or sat) at our hotel window, I saw many people walking by dressed in the fashion of the early 1860s!

TestPeople dressed in the fashion of the 1860s pass by our hotel window.

We went for a walk through a small portion of the Gettysburg National Cemetery, where we heard drums and bugles and fifes and saw one large group of Civil War reenactors and a couple smaller groups marching in the Cemetery. The reenactors stopped and honored members of their portrayed units who were killed or died from wounds at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Civil War reenactors honoring members of their portrayed units

Civil War reenactors honoring members of their portrayed units

 

The first Remembrance Day parade was held 62 years ago in 1956, the year that I was born.  The parade features Civil War living history groups.  The parade lined up on Lefever Street, made a left onto Baltimore Street, right onto Steinwehr Avenue and proceeded up Steinwher Avenue and made a left onto Taneytown Road, up Taneytown Road and then a left onto Cyclorama Drive where the parade dispersed.  We watched the parade from Taneytown Road.  The parade began at 1:00 pm and lasted just under 35 minutes. 

The Remembrance Day parade was really nice, with lots of union and confederate representation, lots of flags, civilians, horses, and at least two Abraham Lincoln’s!

Shortly after 5:00 pm we walked to the Gettysburg National Cemetery, where we walked along a pathway lit with luminary candles.  Luminary candles were lit on each of the 3,512 Civil War Union soldier’s graves.   

Remembrance Illumination

Remembrance Illumination

Remembrance Illumination

The lighted candles were a beautiful thing to see and a touching tribute to the sacrifices made by these Civil War soldiers.

In my next blog post about our Gettysburg vacation, I will share photographs and details from our battlefield tour.

 

 

 

Our Hawaiian Vacation: The Day and Night Before our Flight

Thursday, August 30th, was the first day of our 14-day Hawaiian vacation.

We left our home at 9:30 and arrived at the Courtyard Pittsburgh Airport around 12:30 pm. We took advantage of the hotel’s stay, park and fly rate plan. Our hotel stay cost just a little more than it would have cost to park our car for 13 days at Pittsburgh Airport.

Check-in time was 3:00 pm. We knew we were early, but often we can be checked in early. Our room was not ready but would be in about an hour. I asked the hotel clerk for a restaurant suggestion. She gave us three nearby suggestions: Eat ‘n Park, Primanti Brothers and Armstrong’s. We chose Armstrong’s Restaurant. The restaurant, which is generally known for its Italian foods, was located in a small strip mall. In additional to Italian menu items, there were non-Italian dishes available as well. Bob ordered Cajun Chicken with Ziti and Coleslaw. I ordered Chicken Parmesan with Linguine and Applesauce. A large basket of fresh Italian bread accompanied our meals. We had a great dining experience. Our waitress was friendly and continuously checked on us. The food was delicious.  The portions large…good value for price paid. We boxed up enough leftovers for two more meals! We did leave room for cherry cheesecake, which we shared. We had never seen such a large slice of cheesecake. The cheesecake was delicious.

We returned to Courtyard Pittsburgh Airport before 1:30 pm. I had telephoned the hotel, while en route, and changed our room from two queen beds to a king room so that we could have a patio room with a walkout to the courtyard. A king room costs a little more than a room with two queen beds, but our lower price was honored.

Bob packed his Fire TV, so later in the afternoon we watched the newest episode of “Castle Rock” on Hulu.

Dinner was our lunch leftovers. There is no microwave in our room, so we reheated the leftovers using a microwave located in the lobby. We found paper plates and plastic dinnerware in the lobby area. We ate dinner in our room.

When we vacationed in Hawaii in May 2010, we stayed at this hotel as well the day before our flight.  The courtyard has changed since then.

20180830_220509618_iOSThe courtyard in 2018

D5162328 4x6The courtyard in 2010

The buildings are now gray and white. There are less trees and shrubbery in the courtyard, when compared to 2010.

Stay tuned for more posts on our Hawaiian vacation.

 

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